Tag Archives: linux

Reading Oracle memory dumps

Every DBA working with the Oracle database must have seen memory dumps in tracefiles. It is present in ORA-600 (internal error) ORA-7445 (operating system error), system state dumps, process state dumps and a lot of other dumps.
This is how it looks li…

Oracle database operating system memory allocation management for PGA – part 4: Oracle 11.2.0.4 and AMM

This is the 4th post in a series of posts on PGA behaviour of Oracle. Earlier posts are: here (PGA limiting for Oracle 12), here (PGA limiting for Oracle 11.2) and the quiz on using PGA with AMM, into which this blogpost dives deeper.
As laid out in th…

Oracle database operating system memory allocation management for PGA – part 3: Oracle 11.2.0.4 and AMM: Quiz

This is a series of blogposts on how the Oracle database makes use of PGA. Earlier posts can be found here (PGA limiting for Oracle 12) and here (PGA limiting for Oracle 11.2).
Today a little wednesday fun: a quiz.
What do you think will happen in the …

Oracle database operating system memory allocation management for PGA – part 2: Oracle 11.2

This is the second part of a series of blogpost on Oracle database PGA usage. See the first part here. The first part described SGA and PGA usage, their distinction (SGA being static, PGA being variable), the problem (no limitation for PGA allocations …

Oracle database operating system memory allocation management for PGA

This post is about memory management on the operating system level of an Oracle database. The first question that might pop in your head is: isn’t this a solved problem? The answer is: yes, if you use Oracle’s AMM (Automatic Memory Manageme…

Physical IO on Linux

I posted a fair amount of stuff on how Oracle is generating IOs, and especially large IOs, meaning more than one Oracle block, so > 8KB. This is typically what is happening when the Oracle database is executing a row source which does a full segment…

How to *really* send a script to the background

Let’s check this small script
– foo.sh

#!/bin/sh
echo foo.1:`date` | tee $HOME/tmp/foo.txt
sleep 3
echo foo.2:`date` | tee -a $HOME/tmp/foo.txt

$ $HOME/tmp/foo.sh
foo.1:Thu Nov 27 17:34:53 CET 2014
foo.2:Thu Nov 27 17:34:56 CET 2014

Ve…