Video : Ansible Playbooks : Files and Templates

In today’s video we demonstrate how to use handlers in Ansible Playbooks.

The video is based on the following article.

You might find some useful stuff here.

The star of today’s video is Dan Norris, who is looking to the heavens for inspiration. 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Video : Ansible Playbooks : Handlers

In today’s video we demonstrate how to use handlers in Ansible Playbooks.

The video is based on the following article.

You might find some useful stuff here.

The star of today’s video is my dad, Graham Wood, who spend most of his time galivanting and spending my inheritance, which I’ve been waiting patiently for!

Cheers

Tim…

Video : Ansible Playbooks : Host and Group Variables

In today’s video we demonstrate how to use lists and loops in Ansible Playbooks.

The video is based on the following article.

You might find some useful stuff here.

The star of today’s video is Toon Koppelaars, famous for The Helsinki Declaration (IT Version), which you may know better these days as the SmartDB approach to building applications.

Cheers

Tim…

Video : Ansible Playbooks : Lists and Loops

In today’s video we demonstrate how to use lists and loops in Ansible Playbooks.

The video is based on the following article.

You might find some useful stuff here.

The star of today’s video is Øyvind Isene, who took a break during coffee time to let me film this clip.

Cheers

Tim…

Video : Ansible Playbooks : Introduction

In today’s video we’ll introduce Ansible Playbooks.

There’s quite a lot to cover, so this is only one of several videos covering playbooks. The video is based on the following article.

You might find some useful stuff here.

The star of today’s video is Bailey, who has been known to associate with Connor McDonald at times…

Cheers

Tim…

Video : Ansible : Installation and Configuration

In today’s video we’ll cover the installation and configuration of Ansible.

The video is based on the following article, and will be the first in a series of videos.

You might find some useful stuff here.

The star of today’s video is Neil Chandler, who took time out of his busy bathroom schedule to record this clip.

Cheers

Tim…

How are you provisioning your databases on-prem and in the cloud? Poll results discussed.

Following on from my previous post, I wanted to discuss the results of the polls regarding database provisioning.

This was the first question I asked.

How are you provisioning your databases on-prem and in the cloud?

A couple of years ago I stopped putting GUI installation articles on my website. They look pretty and seem to get a lot of views, but I thought posting them was wrong because I never use GUI installations. Posting them felt like I was sending the wrong message. I wrote about that here. This was one of the reasons I lead with this question. I was pleased with the results of the poll.

  • Using GUI: I understand some people don’t want to take a step backwards to move forwards, but at nearly 20%, this number is still too high IMHO. You can’t check button clicks into version control. I’m sure some smart arse will tell me you can if you use Robotic Process Automation (RPA) to click them. 🙂
  • Shell scripts: If I’m honest I thought 34% was on the low side. I was expecting more people to be using silent installations using shell scripts, but the number is lower because of the next option. If people have made a big investment into writing robust shell scripts with good error handling, I can understand the reluctance to move away from them. Ansible and Terraform are nice, but they are not magic. 🙂
  • Ansible/Terraform/Other: This was actually the surprise of bunch. I wasn’t expecting this number to be so high, but I was pleasantly surprised. The previous post showed lots of people running their databases in the cloud, which has no doubt helped to drive the uptake of automation tools like Ansible and Terraform. Happy days!

Spurred on by a question from Jasmin Fluri, I asked the following question to drill down a little more.

For people using Ansible and/or Terraform, how automated is your process?

This was also a pleasant surprise.

  • We run it manually: I was expecting this to be way ahead of the pack, but at nearly 38% I was wrong, which made me happy. I have no problem if people are running Ansible or Terraform manually. A pipeline is just a bunch of building blocks threaded together. The fact people have taken the time to build these blocks is great. Threading them together is nice, but it’s not the “be all and end all”. The important bit is the definitions of the systems are in code!
  • Automated pipeline: Over 33% made me happy. My assumption was this would be lower, and I wrong and I’m glad.
  • Terrahawks was a cartoon: The people who picked this were wrong! Terrahawks was a kids TV show using puppets, not animation. I’m really surprised nobody noticed this. The community let me down! 😉 If we discount this response from the mix, it makes the other two responses close to 50:50, which is cool.

On a bit of a tangent, I wanted to know how dominant Git was these days.

What Version Control System (VCS) are you suing for your database scripts and code?
  • Git – On Prem: I knew Git would dominate, but I wasn’t sure if people would be hosting their repositories on-prem or in the cloud. With a response of over 30%, that means nearly half of the Git users were hosting their repositories on-prem, which was higher than I expected.
  • Git – Cloud-based: I expected this to dominate, so 37% was a little lower than I expected. Only a little over half of the Git users were using cloud-based repositories. We use cloud-based Git repositories, but we always keep a backup on-prem. Just in case.
  • Other VCS – Not Git: I expected this to have a reasonable showing as VCS software like Subversion used to be really popular, so I knew things would linger. Nearly 19% isn’t bad. I don’t think there is anything wrong with using something other than Git, but Git has become so pervasive in tooling it probably makes sense to take the plunge.
  • VCS is for wimps: I’m hoping nearly 13% of the respondents were picking this to wind me up, but I suspect they weren’t. If you are not currently using version control, please start!

Version control is at the heart of automation, DevOps, Infrastructure as Code (IaC) and all that funky business, so if people can just get that right they have taken the first step on the journey.

So overall this makes very pleasant reading. Lots of people are provisioning databases using some form of scripting, rather than GUIs, and a bunch of people are automating that provisioning. This is what I wanted to hear.

Cheers

Tim…

PS. You know the caveats. These are small sample sizes. My audience has an Oracle bias. I’m no expert at automation, DevOps and the cloud. Just a keen dabbler.

Fear of a Robot Planet

I’ve been on a retro-kick recently, and I’ve been listening to some Isaac Asimov books on Audible.

During the Robot series there is a constant theme of some people distrusting robots. Despite being brought up on a diet of films where robots turn bad, I’ve never really shared this feeling.

Anyway, I thought I would test my brother’s family by showing them this video by Boston Dynamics.

My nephews were intrigued, but not totally phased by it. One said something to the tune of, it moves like a man in a suit, but it’s clearly not. My sister-in-law had a very negative reaction. She was wincing and saying it was horrible. It seems these robots are already “too human” for her tastes.

So in this regard, the predictions made by Isaac Asimov when he started to write about robots in the 1940’s were spot on. It’s going to take a lot of adjustment for some humans to feel comfortable around humanoid robots.

I, for one, welcome our killer robot overlords! 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

PS. When I was thinking about the title of this post I had the song Kool Thing by Sonic Youth going through my head, because of Kim Gordon saying, “fear of a female planet”. I guess I could have been thinking about Fear of a Black Planet by Public Enemy.

Why Automation Matters : Dealing With Vulnerabilities

The recent Log4j issues have highlighted another win for automation, from a couple of different angles.

Which Servers Are vulnerable?

There are a couple of ways to determine this. I guess the most obvious is to scan the servers and see which ones ping for the vulnerability, but depending on your server real estate, this could take a long time.

An alternative is to manage your software centrally and track which servers have downloaded and installed vulnerable software. This was mentioned by a colleague in a meeting recently…

My team uses Artifactory as a central store for a lot of our base software, like:

  • Oracle Database and patches.
  • WebLogic and patches.
  • SQLcl
  • ORDS
  • Java
  • Tomcat

In addition the developers use Artifactory to store their build artifacts. Once the problem software is identified, you could use a tool like Artifactory to determine which servers contained vulnerable software. That would be kind-of handy…

This isn’t directly related to automation, as you could use a similar centralised software library for manual work, but if you are doing manual builds there’s more of a tendency to do one-off things that don’t follow the normal procedure, so you are more likely to get false negatives. If builds are automated, there is less chance you will “acquire” software from somewhere other than the central library.

Fixing Vulnerable Software

If you use CI/CD, it’s a much simpler job to swap in a new version of a library or package, retest your software and deploy it. If your automated testing has good coverage, it may be as simple as commit to your source control. The quick succession of Log4j releases we’ve seen recently would have very little impact on your teams.

If you are working with containers, the deployment process would involve a build of a new image, then replacing all containers with new ones based on the new image. Pretty simple stuff.

If you are working in a more traditional virtual machine or physical setup, then having automated patching and deployments would give you similar benefits, even though it may feel more clunky…

Conclusion

Whichever way you play it, the adoption of automation is going to improve your reaction time when things like this happen again in the future, and make no mistake they will happen again!

I wrote a series of posts about automation here.

Cheers

Tim…

Performance/Flow : Focusing on the Constraint

Over a decade ago Cary Millsap was doing talks at Oracle conferences called “Thinking Clearly About Performance”. One of the points he discussed was identifying the big bottlenecks and dealing with those, rather than focusing on the little things that weren’t causing a problem. For example, if a task is made up of two operations where one takes 60 seconds to complete and the other one takes 1 second to complete, which one will give the most benefit if optimized?

This is the same issue when we are looking at automation to improve flow in DevOps. There are a whole bunch of things we might consider automating, but it makes sense to try and fix the things that are causing the biggest problem first, as they will give the best return. In DevOps and Lean terms that is focusing on the constraint. The weakest link in the chain. (see Theory of Constraints).

Lost in Automation

The reason I mention this is I think it’s really easy to get lost during automation. We often focus on what we can automate, rather than what needs automating. With my DBA hat on it’s clear my focus will be on the automation of provisioning and patching databases and application servers, but how important is that for the company?

  • If the developers want to “build & burn” environments, including databases, for their CI/CD pipelines, then automation of database and application server provisioning is really important as it might happen multiple times a day for automated testing.
  • If the developers use a more traditional dev, test, prod approach to environments, then the speed of provisioning new systems may be a lot less important to the overall performance of the company.

In both cases the automation gives benefits, but in the first case the benefits are much greater. Even then, is this the constraint? Maybe the problems is it takes 14 days for approval to run the automation? 🙂

It’s sometimes hard for techies to have a good idea of where they fit in the value chain. We are often so focused on what we do, and don’t have a clue about the bigger picture.

Before we launch into automation, we need to focus on where the big problems are. Deal with the constraints first. That might mean stopping what you’re doing and going to help another team…

Don’t Automate Bad Process

We need to streamline processes before automating them. It’s a really bad idea to automate bad processes, because they will become embedded for life. It’s hard enough to get rid of bad processes because the, “it’s what we’ve always done”, inertia is difficult to overcome. If we add automation around that bad process we will never get rid of it, because now people will complain we are breaking the automation if we alter the process.

Another thing Cary talked about was removing redundant steps. You can’t make something faster than not doing it in the first place. 🙂 It’s surprising how much useless crap becomes embedded in processes as they evolve over the years.

The process of continuous improvement involves all aspects of the business. We have to be willing to revise our processes to make sure they are optimal, and build our automation around those optimised processes.

I’m not advocating compulsory tuning disorder. We’ve got to be sensible about this stuff.

Know When to Cut Your Losses

The vast majority of examples of automation and DevOps are focussed on software delivery in software development focused companies. It can be very frustrating listening to people harp on about this stuff when you work in a mixed environment with a load of 3rd party applications that will never be automated because they can’t be. They can literally break every rule you have in place and you are still stuck with them because the business relies on them.

You have to know where to cut your losses and move on. There will be some systems that will remain manual and crappy for as long as they are in your company. You can still try and automate around them, and maybe end up in a semi-automated state, but forget wasting your time trying to get to 1000 deployments a day. 🙂

I wrote about this in a post called I’m 2% DevOps, 3% agile and 4% automated because of 3rd party apps.

Try to Understand the Bigger Picture

I think it makes sense for us to all to try and get a better understanding of the bigger picture. It can be frustrating when you’ve put in a lot of work to automate something and nobody cares, because it wasn’t perceived as a problem in the big picture. I’m not suggesting we all have to be business analysts and system architects, but it’s important we know enough about the big picture so we can direct our efforts to get the maximum results.

I wrote a series of posts about automation here.

Cheers

Tim…