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Comments for WebLogic Server 11g and 12c : Changing Heap Size and other Managed Server Start Arguments


eMarcel said...

Hello,

What if we would like to configure different JVM Heap sizes for managed servers we run. For example 4Gb for SOA 2 GB for BAM 1 GB for Admin and so on.
In this case applying common settings to startManagedServers script is not the right way to do this? Would it be better to create conditions per managed server name and set JVM sizes?

Cheers!
Marcin

Tim... said...

Hi.

You could do that, or create copies of the script, named for each type of managed server and use that...

Cheers

Tim...

Mark said...

Hi Tim,
I tried doing this is my managed weblogic server but I am encountering below error
Error: Could not find or load main class –Xms2048m
Stopping Derby server...
Derby server stopped.

This is a newly installed Weblogic Server in an Oracle Linux 7

Tim... said...

Hi.

I think you may have made the changes I suggest incorrectly. You should only be altering the JAVA_OPTIONS, either in the startup script, or in the console. Neither of these should affect class loading.

Cheers

Tim...

monica said...

Hi Tim,
specifying the settings in property JAVA_OPTIONS is not correct.
The out of the box start-up script specifies them in property MEM_ARGS. If you put them in JAVA_OPTIONS you will have 2 settings of the same thing.
The correct place to specify them is in property USER_MEM_ARGS.
As described in setDomainEnv.sh/.cmd

Arijit said...

Suppose there is increased memory for a JVM. And load on server is going to increase. What is the better approach to handle this? Using increased memory to create more managed servers or increasing the heap size for existing managed servers?

Tim... said...

Hi.

It really depends. You will probably need more than the default memory on any managed server that is doing some load, but it is often better to have more smaller managed servers than one big one. With multiple managed servers, you do need to include a load balancer though.

Cheers

Tim...

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