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Police Arrest Three For Posting 10 Minute Movie Summaries On YouTube - AmiMoJo shares a report from TorrentFreak: Police in Japan have arrested three individuals who uploaded so-called "fast movies" to YouTube. These edits of mainstream movie titles, that use copyrighted content to reveal entire plotlines in around 10 minutes, are said to discourage people from watching the originals, costing the industry hundreds of millions in lost revenue. According to Content Overseas Distribution Association (CODA), there are channels with hundreds of uploads being viewed tens of millions of times, often with a for-profit motive. This means that they may fall outside traditional "fair use" style exceptions. Miyagi Prefectural Police Life Safety Division and the Shiogama Police Station arrested three suspects under suspicion of uploading "fast movies" to YouTube without the rightsholders' consent. The arrests were reportedly carried out under the Copyright Act, which was boosted with new amendments on January 1, 2021. "From June to July 2020, the suspects edited 'I Am a Hero' and two other motion pictures owned by Toho Co., Ltd. as well as 'Cold Fish' and one other motion picture owned by Nikkatsu Corporation down to about 10 minutes without the permission of the right holders. Further, the suspects added narration and uploaded the videos to YouTube to earn advertising revenue," CODA explains. All of the channels shared by CODA appear to be operated from Japan but there is no shortage of YouTube channels operated from the US too.

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(2021-06-25T10:00:00+00:00)

Heart Problems After Vaccination Are Very Rare, Federal Researchers Say - The coronavirus vaccines made by Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna may have caused heart problems in more than 1,200 Americans, including about 500 who were younger than age 30, according to data reported on Wednesday by researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Still, the benefits of immunization greatly outweighed the risks, and advisers to the C.D.C. strongly recommended vaccination for all Americans 12 and older. The New York Times: The heart problems reported are myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart muscle; and pericarditis, inflammation of the lining around the heart. The risk is higher after the second dose of an mRNA vaccine than after the first, the researchers reported, and much higher in men than in women. But overall, the side effect is very uncommon -- just 12.6 cases per million second doses administered. The researchers estimated that out of a million second doses given to boys ages 12 to 17, the vaccines might cause a maximum of 70 myocarditis cases, but would prevent 5,700 infections, 215 hospitalizations and two deaths. Agency researchers presented the data to members of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, which makes recommendations on vaccine use in the United States. (The scientists grouped pericarditis with myocarditis for reporting purposes.) Most cases were mild, with symptoms like fatigue, chest pain and disturbances in heart rhythm that quickly cleared up, the researchers said. Of the 484 cases reported in Americans under age 30, the C.D.C. has definitively linked 323 cases to vaccination. The rest remain under investigation.

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(2021-06-25T07:00:00+00:00)

Large-Scale CO2 Removal Facility Set For Scotland - An anonymous reader quotes a report from the BBC: A large facility capable of extracting significant amounts of carbon dioxide from the air is being planned for north east Scotland. The proposed plant would remove up to one million tonnes of CO2 every year -- the same amount taken up by around 40 million trees. The extracted gas could be stored permanently deep under the seabed off the Scottish coast. This Direct Air Capture (DAC) plan is a joint project between UK firm Storegga and Canadian company Carbon Engineering. It's at a very early stage of development -- today's announcement is the beginning of the engineering and design of the plant. A feasibility study has already been carried out and if everything goes well, the facility would be operational by 2026. Storegga say up to 300 jobs would be created in the construction phase. However there are many hurdles, including planning and finance -- and a site for the plant won't be selected until next year. If it does go ahead it would be the biggest DAC facility in Europe and depending on the final configuration, could be the biggest in the world. Why Scotland? The companies cite the country's skilled workforce needed to operate a DAC facility, given their abundant renewable energy sources. The country also has pipelines going out under the sea to allow the permanent burial of the captured carbon.

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(2021-06-25T03:30:00+00:00)

Dinosaurs Lived In the Arctic, Research Suggests - An array of tiny fossils suggests dinosaurs not only roamed the Arctic, but hatched and raised their young there too. The Guardian reports: While dinosaur fossils have previously been found in the Arctic, it was unclear whether they lived there year-round or were seasonal visitors. Now experts say hundreds of fossils from very young dinosaurs recovered from northern Alaska indicates the creatures reproduced in the region, suggesting it was their permanent home. Prof Gregory Erickson, a palaeobiologist at Florida State University and a co-author of the research, said the discovery was akin to a prehistoric maternity ward, adding it was very rare to find remains of such young dinosaurs because they are so small and delicate. Writing in the journal Current Biology, Erickson and colleagues reported how they analysed fossils recovered from the Upper Cretaceous Prince Creek Formation in a series of expeditions spanning a decade and involved the use of fine mesh screens to sift sediments. Though remains from dinosaurs have previously been found in the formation, none showed evidence of reproduction. But the new research has revealed the discovery of tiny teeth and bones from young dinosaurs, including those who were just about to hatch or had recently done so. The fossils, dating to around 70m years ago, came from large and small-bodied dinosaurs covering at least seven different types -- including duck-billed and horned dinosaurs. Teeth were also found from a young tyrannosaur, said Erickson, possibly just six months old. While the findings rule out the idea that dinosaurs only moved north after reproduction, Erickson added that young hatched in the Arctic would have been too small to travel south for the winter. "Given long incubation periods, small hatching sizes, and the short Arctic summer, it is very unlikely the dinosaurs were migrating," he said. The team said the conclusion that the dinosaurs likely lived in the Arctic year-round is backed up by other evidence, including that many of the species have not been found in rocks of a similar age at lower latitudes. At the time that dinosaurs roamed the Arctic, the region would have lacked big polar ice caps and had conifer forests, but the researchers say the creatures still faced harsh conditions, with up to 120 days of continuous darkness in the winter and an average annual temperature of just above 6C.

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(2021-06-25T02:10:00+00:00)

Windows 11 Drops Skype As a Default App - Microsoft is shoving Skype out of sight in favor of Microsoft Teams, which gets a highlight spot in the new center-aligned taskbar and deep integration into Windows. The Verge reports: Today's Windows 11 news is all about where Microsoft sees computing going over the next few years, but it's just as much the story of how Skype has flourished and ebbed since its $8.5 billion acquisition a decade ago. Five years ago, Skype was the big name in internet calling and video, and Microsoft made it an "inbox app" for Windows 10 that was included at installation and launched at startup by default. Now, after a pandemic year that has had more people using their PCs for voice and video than ever before, Skype was nowhere to be seen in the Windows 11 presentation or materials. The future vision that Microsoft had for Skype everywhere has turned into a reality -- but that reality made competitors Zoom and FaceTime into household names instead. Back in June, when Microsoft made Teams available for personal accounts, the company still paid lip service to Skype, saying, "For folks that just want a very purpose-built app, Skype is a great solution, and we support it and encourage it." But now, if you want to use Skype, you're going to have to go find it in the Microsoft Store like any other app. A company spokesperson tells The Verge: "Skype is no longer an inbox app for new devices that run Windows 11. The Skype app is available to download through the Microsoft Store for free."; Skype joins OneNote, Paint 3D, and 3D Viewer as the apps that will no longer come with the OS.

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(2021-06-25T01:30:00+00:00)

All-Night Antitrust Debate Moves Big Tech Bills Forward - The House Judiciary Committee advanced a bill to prevent companies like Amazon.com, Apple, Facebook and Alphabet's Google from favoring their own products, a measure that critics warned could complicate the use of Apple's own apps on its iPhone or shopping on Amazon. From a report: The legislation was the fifth bill out of six being taken up by the committee in a session that ran for nearly 20 hours into early Thursday morning, before breaking until later in the day. The measure, sponsored by antitrust subcommittee Chair David Cicilline, advanced on a narrowly bipartisan 24-20 vote. The marathon session featured recurring clashes over whether software giant Microsoft would be subject to the committee's four bills focused on the biggest tech companies. The criteria for a "covered platform" in those proposals are based on market capitalization, monthly users and whether other businesses depend on the company's services. The extensive back and forth featured debate about antitrust principles, content moderation, freedom of speech and even how legislation should define a foreign adversary. These discussions didn't fall along party lines, and in some cases showed disagreement among Democrats and found Republicans pitted against each other.

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(2021-06-25T00:10:00+00:00)

Windows 11 Requires an Internet Connection and Microsoft Account At Setup - Slashdot reader xack points out that Windows 11, Microsoft's next version of its desktop operating system, will require a Microsoft account and internet connection for setup. They write: Based on Microsoft's official requirements you need an internet connection to install Windows 11. This means people without internet access at home, especially in rural and poorer households, won't be able to use Windows 11. I hope Microsoft fixes this problem before release. Previous versions of Windows "would let you opt out of Microsoft accounts by creating a local account instead," notes The Verge. "It's possible you'll still be able to use a local account afterwards." As for the internet requirement, The Verge says it "may make sense since Windows 11 will largely be delivered via a Windows Update, like many of the updates to Windows 10, so you'd need an internet connection to install it on your PC." Microsoft is also changing the Windows 11 minimum requirements, though they are only slightly higher than what's required to run Windows 10.

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(2021-06-24T23:30:00+00:00)

Blockchain.com Will Let People Use Human-Readable Usernames In Blockchain Transactions - An anonymous reader quotes a report from VentureBeat: Blockchain.com will let people use human-readable usernames in blockchain transactions thanks to a partnership with Unstoppable Domains. San Francisco-based Blockchain.com now supports Unstoppable Domains, a domain name provider for blockchains, which are the secure and transparent digital ledgers behind cryptocurrencies. That's a big deal because Blockchain.com is the world's largest crypto wallet provider, and people have been stumbling around with encoded names that are impossible to remember. And when people lose these names for their wallets or the passwords that go with them, they are often unable to recover their names. This particular deal won't help you with your passwords, but it does help with usernames. And that helps people send money to each other more easily, with fewer mistakes. Traditionally, sending Bitcoin, Ethereum, Doge, and other cryptocurrencies requires entering the recipient's 25- to 42-digit alphanumeric wallet address, said Matthew Gould, CEO of Unstoppable Domains, said in an interview with VentureBeat. If a person mistypes or miscopies a wallet address, those funds can be lost forever. Now, instead of "156i6HJfMWb1h2BEsKpfvZ2tQugqo4vs2w," users can simply type "[YourName].crypto" to send money to others or transfer it between accounts. "What is funny is this is a case of history repeating itself because we did the exact same thing with computer networks in the 90s, where the very first way to look up websites was actually using IP addresses," Gould said. "You actually had to remember long strings of numbers in order to find the very first content on the internet. And then they invented a naming service for those so that you could use .com names. It's a very similar thing."

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(2021-06-24T22:50:00+00:00)

Altice Is Reducing Cable-Internet Upload Speeds To Bring Them 'In Line With Other ISPs' - Altice is slashing its cable-Internet upload speeds by up to 86 percent starting on July 12 to bring them "in line with other ISPs." Ars Technica reports: Altice Optimum Online plans that currently have advertised upload speeds of 35Mbps will be reduced to uploads of either 5Mbps, 10Mbps, or 20Mbps, depending on the plan. Altice did not announce any immediate price changes on the plans that are getting upload-speed cuts. The only good news for users is that the change will not affect existing customers as long as they stay on their current service plans, an Altice spokesperson told Ars. But new customers will have to accept the lower upload speeds, and existing customers would have to take the lower upload speeds whenever they upgrade, downgrade, or change service, Altice said. Altice claimed that its cable network isn't having any trouble offering its current advertised speeds. "Our network continues to perform very well despite the significant data usage increases during the pandemic and the speed tiers we offer," the company said. The upload-speed change is apparently being implemented not to solve any network problem but to match the slower upload speeds offered by other cable ISPs. Altice told Ars that it is changing its cable upload speeds to bring them "in line with other ISPs and aligned with the industry." Altice listed the upcoming changes in a chart on its website.

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(2021-06-24T22:10:00+00:00)

Microsoft Is Changing the Windows 11 Minimum Requirements - The specs required to run Microsoft's new Windows 11 OS are only slightly higher than Windows 10's current requirements. All you'll need is a 64-bit CPU (or SoC), 4GB of RAM, and 64GB of storage. The Verge reports: This marks the end of Windows support for older 32-bit hardware platforms, even though it will continue to run 32-bit software. The fastest way to find out if your system can handle Windows 11 is to download Microsoft's PC Health App, which will automatically tell you if your specs and settings are ready for the new OS. The system requirements listed by Microsoft are [available here].

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(2021-06-24T21:30:00+00:00)

Amazon Tells Drivers 'Endorphins Are Your Friend' On Amazon Prime Day - An anonymous reader quotes a report from Motherboard: Amazon's signature sales event has ended for customers, but Amazon drivers around the world are still working extended hours on routes with hundreds of stops to get those Amazon Prime Day packages delivered. In the United Kingdom, Amazon distributed a set of five tips to its drivers for "keep[ing] in top shape" during Amazon Prime Day: eat breakfast, drink water, take breaks, stay positive, and stop for lunch. But following these tips is impossible for many Amazon drivers who aren't even employed by the company. Amazon delivery drivers face extreme pressure from their contractors, known as Amazon Delivery Partners, who are in turn paid and evaluated by Amazon. In other words, they have to finish their routes as quickly as possible, often under pressure to circumvent safety rules, traffic laws, and skip legally mandated breaks in order to hit delivery targets. "Keep it positive: Endorphins are your friend!" one of the tips on the flyer distributed to Amazon drivers reads. "Keep them flowing by staying on the move, and striking up a conversation." On Facebook forums, where surviving the Amazon sales event has been a frequent topic of conversation among drivers in recent days, drivers joked about Amazon's tips. "Take your lunch and breaks. Sure, if you want [your dispatcher] on your ass saying you're 20 or so stops behind," an Amazon delivery driver in Los Angeles wrote. "I don't take a break. I eat and drink as I go, as I like to get back to see my kids before they go to bed," an Amazon delivery driver in a suburb of London who received the flyer, told Motherboard. "As for striking up conversations, sometimes customers wanna chat, but we always kinda respond like, 'Haha that's great—anyway we gotta go,'" an Amazon delivery driver in Virginia told Motherboard.

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(2021-06-24T20:50:00+00:00)

Biden's New $1.2 Trillion Infrastructure Plan Includes $65 Billion for Universal Broadband - CNET News: President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris on Thursday agreed to a $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure plan that includes building out high-speed universal broadband across the nation. The infrastructure framework will use two-thirds of the resources from Biden's proposed American Jobs Plan, and also includes clean transportation, clean water infrastructure, renewable energy infrastructure and climate change resilience. Under the plan, $65 billion will be invested in broadband for all. It proposes state and local investment in broadband infrastructure as well as using the proceeds from 5G spectrum auctions. It's a step backwards from the $2.25 trillion infrastructure plan previously proposed by Biden in March, which included $100 billion for broadband infrastructure. In March, Biden spoke about the digital divide, and how more than 30 million Americans have no access to broadband while those living in urban and suburban markets face broadband bills that are too expensive.

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(2021-06-24T20:09:00+00:00)

Hong Kong's Apple Daily To Live On in Blockchain, Free of Censors - Hong Kong cyber activists are backing up articles by pro-democracy tabloid Apple Daily on censorship-proof blockchain platforms after the newspaper was forced to shut down as it became embroiled in a national security law crackdown. From a report: The latest drive to preserve the paper's content comes after activists rushed to upload documentaries by local broadcaster RTHK investigating people in power after the media outlet said it would remove materials older than one year from its social media platforms. Under the national security law, the Hong Kong government can request the blocking or removal of content it deems subversive or secessionist, raising fears over internet freedom in the global financial hub. The Hong Kong government says use of the internet will not be affected so long as its use is within the law. "Law enforcement actions taken by Hong Kong law enforcement agencies are based on evidence, strictly according to the laws of Hong Kong, and for the acts of the person(s) or entity(ies) concerned," a spokesman for the Security Bureau said. This year, the company that approves internet domains in Hong Kong said it would reject any sites that could incite "illegal acts." Internet service provider Hong Kong Broadband Network (HKBN) said it had blocked access to HKChronicles, a website offering information about anti-government protests.

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(2021-06-24T19:30:00+00:00)

Satya Nadella's Closing Windows 11 Remarks Were a Direct Shot Across Apple's Bow - At the end of a surprisingly eventful, exciting presentation of Windows 11, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella came on the video feed to deliver some closing remarks. He laid out his vision for Windows 11 as a "platform for platform creators," and in doing so, he issued a subtle but nonetheless stinging critique of Apple. From a report: Nadella's speech was almost entirely about building a case that Windows would be a better platform for creators than either macOS or (especially) iOS. He argued that "there is no personal computing without personal agency," insisting that users should be more in control of their computers. Nadella called out the changes Microsoft is making to its app store rules, allowing more types of apps, Android apps, and -- most importantly -- allowing apps to use their own payment systems if they so choose. He said, "A platform can only serve society if its rules allow for this foundational innovation and category creation." That rhetoric sounds vaguely nice and inspiring out of context, but in the specific context of the current debates, lawsuits, and legislation over app store rules, it's a sharp and direct critique.

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(2021-06-24T19:05:00+00:00)

An Internal Code Repo Used By New York State's IT Office Was Exposed Online - A code repository used by the New York state government's IT department was left exposed on the internet, allowing anyone to access the projects inside, some of which contained secret keys and passwords associated with state government systems. From a report: The exposed GitLab server was discovered on Saturday by Dubai-based SpiderSilk, a cybersecurity company credited with discovering data spills at Samsung, Clearview AI and MoviePass. Organizations use GitLab to collaboratively develop and store their source code -- as well as the secret keys, tokens and passwords needed for the projects to work -- on servers that they control. But the exposed server was accessible from the internet and configured so that anyone from outside the organization could create a user account and log in unimpeded, SpiderSilk's chief security officer Mossab Hussin told TechCrunch. When TechCrunch visited the GitLab server, the login page showed it was accepting new user accounts. It's not known exactly how long the GitLab server was accessible in this way, but historic records from Shodan, a search engine for exposed devices and databases, shows the GitLab was first detected on the internet on March 18.

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(2021-06-24T18:07:00+00:00)