The Oracle ACE Program : My 14 Year Anniversary

I was checking my calendar, thinking I was about to jack it in for the day, and I noticed it’s April 1st, which means it’s my 14th year anniversary of being an Oracle ACE. Can’t believe I nearly missed that!

As usual I’ll mention some of the other anniversaries that will happen throughout this year.

  • 25 years working with Oracle technology in August. (August 1995)
  • 20 years doing my website in July. (Original name: 03 July 2000 or current name: 31 August 2001)
  • 15 years blogging in June. (15 June 2005)
  • 14 years on the Oracle ACE Program. (01 April 2006)
  • A combined 3 years as an Oracle Developer Champion, now renamed to Oracle Groundbreaker Ambassador. (21 June 2017)

The 20 years of doing the website in July will be a pretty big one. I might have to do something for that. 🙂

I hope everyone is safe out there. Have a good one!

Cheers

Tim…

Video : Online Segment Shrink for Tables : Free Unused Space

In today’s video we’ll give a demonstration of how to shrink tables that contain a lot of free space. As I say in the video, this is not something you should do regularly. It’s only necessary if you’ve done some drastic one-off maintenance, like a large data purge maybe.

There are a few articles this relates to.

The star of today’s video is Kellyn Pot’Vin-Gorman, who is returning to her Oracle roots, but on Azure. 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Video : Kata Containers : Running Containers Inside Lightweight Virtual Machines on Oracle Linux 7 (OL7)

Today’s video demonstrates how to configure Kata Containers on Oracle Linux 7 (OL7), allowing you to run containers inside lightweight virtual machines (VMs).

This video is is based on an article of the same name, but relates to a bunch of other articles and videos on the subject of containers.

The star of today’s video is Jake Kuramoto, originally of The AppsLab fame, and now at WorkDay.

Cheers

Tim…

Data Guard and RAC on Docker : Perhaps I was wrong?

I’ve talked a lot about Docker and containers over the last few years. With respect to the Oracle database on Docker, I’ve given my opinions in this article.

Over the weekend Sean Scott tweeted the following.

“A while back @oraclebase said Data Guard didn’t make sense on Docker.

For those of us disinterested in the sensible I present #Oracle#DataGuard on #Docker. 19c only for now. Please let me know what’s broken. Enjoy!

https://github.com/oraclesean/DataGuard-docker

This was in reference to a statement in my article that said the following.

“Oracle database high availability (HA) products are complicated, often involving the coordination of multiple machines/containers and multiple networks. Real Application Clusters (RAC) and Data Guard don’t make sense in the Docker world. In my opinion Oracle database HA is better done without Docker, but remember not every database has the same requirements.”

For the most part I stick by my statement, for the reasons described in my article. Although both Data Guard and RAC will work in Docker, I generally don’t think they make sense.

But…

A few years ago I had a conversation with Seth Miller, who was doing RAC in Docker. In his case it made sense for testing because of his use cases. I discussed this in this post.

For that use case, Seth was right and I was wrong.

What about Data Guard?

For a two node data guard playground I don’t see any major advantages to using two containers in one VM, compared to two VMs. The overhead of the extra VM and OS is not significant for this use case. Remember, most of the resources are going to the Oracle instances, not the VM and OS. Also, the VM approach will give you something similar to what you will see in production. It feels like a more natural testing scenario to me.

But Sean’s scenario was not this simple. When I questioned him over the value of this, considering the two VM approach had so little extra overhead, he came back with the following.

“There I’ll disagree. I have a Docker/sharding build I’m working on. 7 databases. Starts in moments. On my laptop. I can’t do 7 VM. No way!”

Now this scenario changes the game significantly. All of a sudden we go from the overhead of one extra VM to an overhead of six extra VMs. That’s pretty significant on a laptop. All of a sudden the Docker method probably makes a lot more sense than the VM approach for testing that scenario on a laptop.

Once again, I’m wrong and Sean is correct for this use case.

Conclusion

If you are building a two node RAC or Data Guard playground, I still think the VM approach makes a lot more sense. It’s going to be a lot more like what you use at work, and you don’t have to deal with some of the issues that containers bring with them.

Having said that, if you are looking to build something more extreme, or you are just trying stuff for fun, then Docker may be the right solution for you.

I still don’t see a realistic future for an RDBMS monolith on containers. I don’t care if it’s a single container or a giant Kubernetes cluster. This is not a criticism of the RDBMS or of containers. They are just things from different worlds for different purposes and continuing to treat them differently seems totally fine to me. Having said all that, it doesn’t mean combining the two can’t be useful for some use cases.

Remember, this is just my opinion! 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

PS. As a general point, trying to build your own data service on containers feels like a mistake. I would just use a cloud service that gives you the features, performance and availability you need. Concentrate on your apps.

Video : Returning REF CURSORs from PL/SQL : Functions, Procedures and Implicit Statement Results

Today’s video is a demonstration of returning REF CURSORs from PL/SQL using functions, procedures and implicit statement results.

I was motivated to do this after a conversation with my boss. He’s from a .NET and SQL Server background, and was a bit miffed about not being able to use a SELECT to pass out variable values from a procedure, like you can in T-SQL. So I piped up and said you can using Implicit Statement Results and another myth was busted. I guess most PL/SQL developers don’t use this, and I don’t either, but you should know it exists so you can be a smart arse when situations like this come up. 🙂

The video is based on these articles.

The star of today’s video is Bryn Llewellyn of PL/SQL fame, and more recently Yugabyte.

Cheers

Tim…

Docker Birmingham March 2020

Last night was Docker Birmingham March 2020. It clashed with the Midlands Microsoft 365 and Azure User Group for the second time, so it was Docker Birmingham’s turn this time. 🙂

These events start with food and I was looking longingly at the pizzas, but I know enough about myself to know it would make me sleepy, so I distanced myself from them until later.

First up was Richard Horridge with “A Brief History of Containers”. As the name suggests this was a history lesson, but it started much further back than most do when discussing this subject. With punched cards in fact. Fortunately I never had the “pleasure” of those, but I did find myself thinking, “Oh yeah, I’ve used that!”, about a bunch of stuff mentioned. That’s it. I’m now part of ancient history. I think it’s good for some of the younger folks to understand about the history of some of this stuff, and the difference in focus from the system administration focus of the past, to the application focus of the present.

Next up was Matt Todd with “Say Yes! To K8s and Docker”. Let me start by saying I like Swarm. It feels almost like a dirty statement these days, but I do. Matt started in pretty much the same way. He gave a quick pros vs. cons between Swarm and Kubernetes, then launched into the main body of the talk, which was trying to find a convenient way to learn about Kubernetes on your laptop without needing to install a separate hypervisor. So basically how to run Kubernetes in Docker. He did a comparison between the following.

He picked K3s as his preferred solution.

Along the way he also mentioned these tools to help visualize what’s going on inside a Kubernetes cluster, which helped him as he was learning.

  • Octant. Kind of like Portainer for Kubernetes.
  • K9s. He described as looking like htop for Kubernetes. 

Of course, the obvious question was, “Why not Minikube?”, and that came down to his preference of not having to install another hypervisor. It was an interesting take on the subject, and mentioning Octant certainly got my attention.

So once again, I noobed my way through another event. Thanks to the speakers for taking their time to come and educate us, and to the sponsor Black Cat Technology Solutions for the venue, food and drinks. See you all soon!

Cheers

Tim…

Birmingham Digital & DevOps Meetup – March 2020

On Tuesday evening I was at the Birmingham Digital & DevOps Meetup – March 2020 event, which had four speakers this time.

First up was Mike Bookham from Rancher Labs with “Rancher Labs – Kubernetes”. The session demonstrated how to set up a Kubernetes cluster using RKE (Ranchers Kubernetes Engine). The tool looked pretty straight forward, and Rancher got referenced a few times during this event and the one the next day, so there seems to be some love for them as a company out there.

Next up was Dave Whyte from Auto Trader with “Under the bonnet at Auto Trader”. He did a talk about how Auto Trader use Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE) and Istio for a bunch of their microservices. They do the hundreds of production deployments a day that you come to expect from microservice folks, but the main “Wow!” moment for me was the diagnostics and observability they’ve got. It was amazing. I was just sitting there thinking, there is no way on earth we could do this! Very… Wow! Many of the points are cover in this video.

After the break it was Patricia McMahon from Generation with “AWS re/Start – Resourcing Cloud Teams”. The session was about the work they are doing re-skilling long term unemployed young people as AWS Cloud Engineers, and of course getting them into jobs. I love this sort of stuff. My background was a bit different, but I entered the technology industry via a retraining course after my PhD in cabbage sex. The course I did was available for all age groups, not just young people, but it was a similar thing. I hope they continue to do great work. If you are looking for fresh, enthusiastic and diverse talent, I’m sure Patricia and Generation would love to hear from you!

Last up was Toby Pettit from CapGemini with “Multilingual, Multi-Cloud Apps – A Reality Check”. His abstract said, “All I wanted to do is run any language on any cloud with state and with no servers to maintain. Of course it also needs to be highly available, observable, maintainable, recoverable and all of the other “ables”. How hard can it be?” Well it turns out the answer is bloody hard! I don’t even know where to begin with this. It was Alpha this product and Beta that product. Of course Kubernetes and Istio were in there along with OpenFaaS and loads of other stuff. He showed a demo of a workload being split between AWS, Azure and Google Public Cloud, so it “worked”, but by his own admissions this was a POC, not something you could go to production with. Interesting, but crazy mind blowing. 🙂

Thanks to all the speakers for coming along and making it a great event. Thanks also to CapGemini for sponsoring the event!

Cheers

Tim…

Video : SQLcl and Liquibase : Automating Your SQL and PL/SQL Deployments

In today‘s video we’ll give a quick demonstration of applying changes to the database using the Liquibase implementation in SQLcl.

The video is based on this article.

You might also find these useful. The secure external password store is a good way to make connections with SQLcl. If you support a variety of database engines, you may prefer to use the regular Liquibase client.

The star of today’s video is Steve Karam from Delphix. 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Shadow IT : Low-code solutions can help!

I recently had a bit of a rant on email about the current state of Shadow IT at work. Typically, we don’t know it is happening until something goes wrong, then we’re called in to help and can’t, mostly because we don’t have the resources to do it. My rant went something like this…

“This is shadow IT.

Shadow IT is happening because we are not able to cope with the requirements from the business, so they do it themselves.

We need to stop being so precious about tool-sets and use low-code solutions to give the business the solutions to their problems. This allows us to develop them quicker, and in some cases, let them develop their own safely.”

We are not a software house. We are not the sort of company that can take our existing staff and reasonably launch into microservices this, or functions that. In addition to all the big projects and 3rd party apps we deal with, we also need to provide solutions to small issues, and do it fast.

Like many other companies we have massive amounts of shadow IT, where people have business processes relying on spreadsheets or Access databases, that most of us in IT don’t know exist. As I mentioned in the quote above, this is happening because we are failing! We are not able to respond to their demands. Why?

For the most part we make the wrong decisions about technology stacks for this type of work. We just need simple solutions to simple problems, that are quick and easy to produce, and more importantly easy to maintain.

What tool are you suggesting? The *only* thing we have in our company that is truly up to date at this time, and has remained so since it was introduced into the company, is APEX. It also happens to be a low-code declarative development solution, that most of our staff could pick up in a few days. The *only* tool we have that allows us to quickly deliver solutions is APEX. So why are we not using it, or some other tool like it? IMHO because of bad decisions!

You’re an Oracle guy, and you are just trying to push the Oracle stack aren’t you? No. Give me something else that does a similar job of low-code declarative development and I will gladly suggest that goes in the list too. I’ve heard good things about Power Apps for this type of stuff. If that serves the purpose better, I’ll quite happily suggest we go in that direction. Whatever the tool is, it must be something very productive, which doesn’t require a massive learning curve, that also gives us the possibility of allowing the business to development for themselves, in a citizen developer type of way.

It should be noted, we are wedded to Oracle for the foreseeable future because of other reasons, so the “Oracle lock-in” argument isn’t a valid for us anyway.

So you’re saying all the other development stuff is a waste of time? No. In addition to the big and “sexy” stuff, there are loads of simple requirements that need simple solutions. We need to be able to get these out of the door quickly, and stop the business doing stuff that will cause problems down the line. If they are going to do something for themselves, I would rather it was done with a tool like APEX, that we can look after centrally. I don’t want to be worrying if Beryl and Bert are taking regular backups of their desktops…

Are you saying APEX is only good for this little stuff? No! I’m saying it does this stuff really well, so why are we using languages, frameworks and infrastructure that makes our life harder and slower for these quick-fire requirements? Like I said, it’s not about the specific tool. It’s what the tool allows us to achieve that’s important.

What would you do it you could call the shots? I would take a couple of people and task them with working through the backlog of these little requirements using a low-code tool. It might be APEX. It might be something else. The important thing is we could quickly make a positive impact on the way the company does things, and maybe reduce the need for some of the shadow IT. It would be really nice to feel like we are helping to win the war on this, but we won’t until we change our attitude in relation to this type of request.

So you think you can solve the problem of shadow IT? No. This will always happen. What I’m talking about is trying to minimise it, rather than being the major cause of it.

Cheers

Tim…

The Goal and The DevOps Handbook (again) : My Reviews

The Goal

In my recent review of The Unicorn Project I mentioned several times how much I loved the The Phoenix Project. Some of the feedback was that I should take a look at The Goal by Eliyahu M. Goldratt. After all, The Phoenix Project is an adaptation of The Goal.

I had a credit on Audible, which I’ll explain later, so I gave it a whirl.

I don’t know if it was the writing, or the voice acting, but The Goal has so much more personality than The Phoenix Project. I can barely believe I’m saying this after the amount of praise I’ve given to The Phoenix Project over the years.

The Goal is centred around manufacturing. It’s about the productivity issues in a failing factory. Despite being part of the tech industry, I feel the focus on manufacturing actually makes it easier to follow. There’s something about picturing physical products that make things seem clearer to me. This, and the fact many of these concepts were born out of manufacturing, are no doubt why The Phoenix Project makes repeated references to manufacturing.

I realise some people will prefer The Phoenix Project, because it more closely resembles what they see in their own failing technology organisations, but I think I’ve changed my opinion, and I think The Goal is now my favourite of the two.

The DevOps Handbook (Again)

Another thing I mentioned in my review of The Unicorn Project, was how much I disliked The DevOps Handbook. That seemed to surprise some people. So much so, I started to doubt myself. I couldn’t bring myself to read it again, so I decided to sign up for Audible and get it as my free book. That way I could listen to it when driving to visit my family at weekends.

I was not wrong about this book. In the comments for The Unicorn Project review, I answered a question about my attitude to The DevOps Handbook with the following answer.

“I found it really boring. I guess I was hoping it would be more of a reference or teaching aid. I found it really dry and quite uninformative for the most part. It mostly felt like a bunch of people “bigging themselves up”. Like, “When I worked at X, things were terrible, and I turned it around by myself and now things are fuckin’ A!” Similar to this book, I think the important messages could be put across in a tiny fraction of the space.”

There are undoubtedly valuable messages in The DevOps Handbook, but my gosh they make you work hard to find them. If they removed all the dick-waving, there wouldn’t be much left.

Another thing I found annoying about it, was it didn’t feel like it really related to my circumstances. I work with a load of third party products that I can’t just scrap, much as I’d like to. I found myself thinking these people were probably just cherry-picking the good stuff to talk about, and forgetting the stuff that was harder to solve. I’ve written about this type of thing in this post.

The messages in the “good DevOps books” are universal. They help you understand your own problems and think your own way through to solving them. I don’t think The DevOps Handbook helps very much at all.

So that’s twice I’ve tried, and twice I’ve come to the same conclusion. Stick with The Goal and The Phoenix Project. There are better things to do with your time and money than wasting it on The DevOps Handbook and The Unicorn Project. That’s just my opinion though!

Cheers

Tim…

PS. By the time I had waded through The DevOps Handbook a second time I had already got a new credit for Audible, which is why I tried The Goal on Audible, rather than reading it. I’m glad I did.

PPS. There are a few cringeworthy gender stereotypes in The Goal, but remember when this was written…