Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13.3 on Oracle Database 19c

I’ve had some articles about Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13.3 on the site for quite a while now. The first installation and upgrade articles were posted over a year ago.

More recently I posted about a Vagrant build and a silent upgrade.

At the time, the certification matrix said Oracle 19c was not certified to hold the OMS repository, so my article and Vagrant build didn’t include it. A few days ago someone asked me if it would work on 19c, and I was just about to reply and say it wasn’t certified, but I thought I better check first. It is now certified (if you are on the latest versions of the DB plugin), so I thought I better give it a run through.

The process was the same for 19c, so all I had do was unzip the 19c media into the renamed ORACLE_HOME and the rest went fine. I’ve done some minor updates to the articles and the Vagrant build to reflect this.

So if you are on OL7/RHEL7, you are good to upgrade to 19c for the OMS repository. 😉

Happy days!

Cheers

Tim…

Update: JE in the comments pointed out the requirement to be on the latest plugins for 19c to work (see here). They also pointed out the loss of the Top Activity screen. From my perspective:

  • I always run with the latest plugins if possible.
  • The Top Activity screen is replaced by the ASH Analytics screen, which does all the same things, but I would say the window adjustment makes it a bit better. It took a little time to get used to it, but I use it in the same way I used the Top Activity screen on versions from 11.2 to 19c with no drama.

Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13.3 Silent Upgrade

A few days ago I put out a post called Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13.3 Vagrant Build. In a comment on that post Dinesh said,

“Would like to see the silent upgrade from oem12c to oem13c upgrade post from you”

I normally try to keep on top of upgrades, so I’ve never done a jump bigger than one version, but I was checking through the documentation, and assuming it’s a supported start version, there isn’t much difference between the upgrades from most versions, so I thought I would give it a go. As I mentioned in the last post, I already had a GUI upgrade article.

I didn’t have a silent upgrade though. I do now. 🙂

In order to try this out I did a Vagrant build of Cloud Control 12cR5, to give me an easy way to get a clean starting point. You can see that here. If you want to practice the upgrade, it’s a really easy way to do it.

I’ve left the agent upgrade using the Cloud Control interface, but there is an example of how to do it silently using WLST here. It’s pretty simple.

So not only did I not expect to be writing that post a few days ago, but I certainly didn’t expect to be writing this one. 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13.3 Vagrant Build

A little short of a year ago I knocked up a Vagrant build to prepare an environment for practising Cloud Control 13.3 installations and upgrades. This just automated the creation of the environment and installation of the database, ready for me to start playing around with the Cloud Control bit. At the time I released these articles.

I didn’t mention anything about the Vagrant build as it didn’t do much more than build the database, so it didn’t seem worth mentioning. It was just a convenience for me.

More recently someone pointed it out on Twitter and I made a note to myself to “finish it off” and make it do a full silent build, then kind-of forgot again.

A few days ago I had a self-induced problem with our Cloud Control server, and I realised I didn’t have the best plan of action for a complete rebuild scenario. I had backups, so I didn’t need to do a rebuild, but that doesn’t stop me wanting to be able to do it, so I did the following things…

I scripted a silent build of the work environment we use. I put together a general article to show how to do a silent build of a simple installation too. If you’re interested you can see it here.

I wrote some EMCLI scripts to do most of the tasks I needed for a complete rebuild. We already use EMCLI for some of the stuff, like jobs, but I filled in the gaps where I had been a bit lazy. Those are all checked into a company Git repo, and they are quite specific to what we need, but there are some basic EMCLI examples available here, if you are interested in getting into EMCLI.

Finally, I made my Vagrant build a fully automated Cloud Control 13.3 build on Oracle database 18c. According to the certification matrix, Oracle 19c is not yet certified for the repository database (but someone on Oracle-L said this certification is imminent (See Update)). If you are interested in playing around with Vagrant, you can find it here. I’ve managed to get away with 6G of memory, but that makes it chronically slow. The more memory you can throw at it the better. 🙂

I didn’t really expect to be revisiting this stuff a year down the line, but it was born out of necessity, or at least necessity for my peace of mind. 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Update: The OMS is now supported on Oracle database 19c.

Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c Release 3 (13.3.0.0) Upgrade

A few months ago I wrote about the installation and upgrade Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c Release 3 (13.3.0.0).

At the time I did a clean install and an example upgrade from 13.2 to 13.3. The idea behind the upgrade was basically to practice what I needed to do at work.

Just before I left for OpenWorld I got our virtualization folks to give me a clone of the production Cloud Control VM and I ran a practice upgrade on that. It’s important to do a “real” run through, as sometimes you hit issues you don’t see when upgrading from a clean installation of the previous version. In the past the upgrade of the clean installation of the previous version has worked fine, but the real upgrade failed the prerequisite checks as some of the agents or plugins were too old. The latest test on the clone worked fine, so we had the green light to do the production upgrade.

Post OOW18, my first job on returning to work was to get Cloud Control upgraded. I repeated the process I had done on the clone and it went fine.

In a funny coincidence, while I was doing the upgrade someone retweeted the blog post from a few months ago. Weird.

As a reminder, here are the 13.3 articles.

Cheers

Tim…

Cloud Control 13c Release 2 (13cR2) : It’s Alive!

o-enterprisemgr-13c-clr-2769481I delayed our upgrade from Cloud Control 13cR1 to 13cR2 until I finished all my travelling. It’s not really fair to make a major change then swan off round the world. 🙂

Yesterday was the day. I got in and started the upgrade, following the process I documented here and it worked. 🙂

ItsAlive

I guess I shouldn’t be surprised. I had tested it all at home anyway.

We now have Cloud Control 13cR2 monitoring all out Dev and Test systems. For the next few days we’ll be kicking the tyres before continuing to roll it out to production, which is still currently monitored by Cloud Control 12cR5.

You can read my notes about this stuff here.

There are some related blog posts on this subject here.

Cheers

Tim…

Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c Release 2 (13cR2) Installation/Upgrade

em13cOracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c Release 2 (13cR2) was released a couple of weeks ago. In a previous post I mentioned we were going to stop our rollout of 13cR1 agents to production and upgrade from 13cR1 to 13cR2 before we resumed.

I don’t like doing anything at work that I haven’t already tried at home, so the first step in that process was for me to do some clean installs and practice upgrades. After a busy weekend and a late night last night I think I’m happy with the process. That resulted in these articles.

If you’ve done a 13cR1 installation, the clean 13cR2 installation will come as no surprise. They now have multitenant and non-CDB repository templates to choose from. I used the multitenant template in this example. The installation was fine on both OL6 and OL7, so nothing out of the ordinary to report there.

The upgrade process was similar to previous point release upgrades too. We used the non-CDB template, the only one available at the time, to build our 13cR1 installation, so not surprisingly I practised the upgrade using that as a starting point. The upgrade process went fine, but I got a lot of warning messages during the process. It was all working fine at the end though…

I guess we will start rolling this bad-boy out once I get back from the APAC Tour and Bulgaria (BGOUG).

Cheers

Tim…

Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c : Navigation and “Look and Feel”

o-enterprisemgr-13c-clr-2769481I’ve continued to play around with Cloud Control 13c and I’m generally getting a nice vibe from it.

One of the things I really hated about Grid Control 10g and 11g was the navigation. It felt like you had to click on 50 links to get to the thing you wanted. When Cloud Control 12c came along and had a main menu it was a massive improvement. Even so, it was still a little annoying as the menu was split, with some bits on the left and some bits on the top-right.

em12c-menu

In Cloud Control 13c, these menus have been brought together into the top-right of the screen.

em13c-menu1

If the screen size is smaller, the buttons collapse to show just the icons, which saves space.

em13c-menu2

It probably sounds really trivial, but having both menus together is a really nice touch. I can’t count the number of times I’ve been fumbling around, unable to find something, only to remember it is in that blasted menu at the top-right. Now there is no excuse. 🙂

The job scheduler navigation is also a lot nicer. In Cloud Control 12c we had a bunch of drop-downs and a “Go” button.

em12c-jobs

In Cloud Control 13c there are tiles along the top to alter the context of the output and the tree on the left allows you to quickly flip between criteria.

em13c-jobs

It is so much quicker to get the information you want this way.

So as far as I’m concerned, Cloud Control 13c is getting a big thumbs-up from a navigation perspective!

A couple of people have asked my impression about the new look and feel. If we ignore the navigation, most of the pages are quite similar to what we had before, so there is no need to panic. Overall it has a sparser, cleaner look, which is more in keeping with the way the web is these days, so I think that’s a good thing. Anyone who has used Oracle Cloud will find the look very familiar. 🙂

I guess the biggest bonus of the new look and feel is it is more responsive. On some of the old pages you had a lot of sideways scrolling to do if you have a small browser window. The new look and feel deals a lot better with that. It’s not perfect, but it is better. So I’m giving the new look and feel a big thumbs-up too!

Being the bitter old man that I am, I reserve the right to change my mind and hate it all in the future. 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Caveat: I use a very small subset of the functionality available from Cloud Control, so my opinion is going to be based on the bits I use a lot. It might be that other areas have been adversely affected by the new navigation or look and feel, but the bits I care about are looking good.

Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c Upgrade

em-12cA couple of weeks ago I posted about doing a fresh installation of Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c (article, blog post). I’ve finally got around to doing an upgrade test from EM CC 12cR5 to 13cR1. You can see the result of that here.

upgrade-meme

Gokhan Atil did a post about this upgrade pretty much as soon as it was released, so I’m a little late to the party compared to him. 🙂

As you’ll see from the article, the upgrade process was similar to the patches that came before it. There are of course some extra prerequisites which you can read about in either my post, Gokhan’s or the docs…

Even though the upgrade tests were fine, after discussion with our system administrators, we are probably going to go for a clean installation and migrate the monitored hosts one at a time.

Why the slash and burn approach? I’ve made some mistakes with our installations in the past and they persist with every subsequent upgrade. It would be nice to take a step back and fix stuff. We are doing a similar thing with our WebLogic installations. I was learning new stuff all the time while I was installing our WebLogic 11g infrastructure. Rather than upgrading to WebLogic 12cR2, we are going to build a new infrastructure, migrate to it and throw the old one away.

This is relatively easy for us for a few reasons.

  1. We use virtualization for everything. We will provision the new VMs, set everything up. Start migrating stuff. When the migration is complete we will throw away the old VMs. No major hardware overhead.
  2. We are a pretty small operation. If we had a massive amount of infrastructure, a slash and burn approach would be very time consuming and as such, very costly.
  3. I am really anal about some things and I am willing to go the extra mile to get things right. I did the best I could at the time, but I’m happy to admit I made mistakes and I want to sort them out. This is not because I’m a company boy. It’s because those mistakes eat away at me and I want them eradicated so they will only haunt me in my memories, not in my day to day life.

If we had been going for the upgrade approach, I probably would have done it in the next couple of weeks. With clean slate approach, we’ll probably take a few more weeks to get ready for it. No point rushing in and making more mistakes. I would rather let the idea brew for a while before we start. 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c : First Steps

o-enterprisemgr-13c-clr-2769481Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c Release 1 (13.1.0.0.0) was released a few days ago. Does that have the acronym “oemcc13cr1”? 🙂

As usual, my first steps are to do some basic installations. The approach is pretty similar to the 12c installations, but it’s a little greedier now. 🙂

My first attempt was a bit of a disaster. I was trying to install it on a VM with 8G of memory, about all I can spare on my work PC) and it was running like a dog. It got nearly to the end of the configuration section and I ran out of disk space on the physical host. That would have been OK if the installer were running on the VM itself, as the VM would have paused and resumed once I had cleared some space. Unfortunately, I was doing from an X session, which got killed and took my installer with it. 🙁 Rather than trying to continue on my piece of shit work PC, I waited until I got home to do it on my server.

Once home, I kicked off two installation simultaneously. One on OL6 and one on OL7. Each VM had 10G of memory and their virtual disks were on different spindles to the OS disk. As a result, they ran through at a reasonable pace. Not mega fast, but OK.

Over the Christmas break I’ll have a go at some upgrades, then decide if we should be doing this in production at work. If you’ve followed the discussion on Twitter, you’ll know some of the basic requirements.

  • Oracle 12c (12.1.0.2) Enterprise Edition for the repository database. Patched to latest security patch.
  • You can use a Non-CDB or a PDB for the management repository. The template database is still non-CDB.
  • OPTIMIZER_ADAPTIVE_FEATURES=FALSE

That means we will need an upgrade of our repository database from 11.2.0.4 to 12.1.0.2. That’s no big drama, but another thing to do. 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Update: Thanks to Seth Miller for pointing out my mistake about the PDB support for the OMR.

Cloud Control 12.1.0.5 : It’s production upgrade day…

cloudI mentioned a couple of months ago I was planning to upgrade our production Enterprise Manager Cloud Control installation from 12.1.0.4 to 12.1.0.5. Well, today was the day. I held back a while because I knew I would be out of the country for a while on the Latin America tour and I didn’t want to make a big change before I ran away. 🙂

So today I pretty much did exactly what was in my upgrade article and everything went well. I upgraded the OMS and the local agent and I’ll run like that for a couple of days before I start pushing out the agent updates to the monitored hosts.

Happy days!

If you are interested, you can see some of my Cloud Control articles here.

Cheers

Tim…