Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13.5

The release of Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13.5 was officially announced last week, but I think it’s been available for download for a little longer. The first I noticed was the official announcement though. 🙂

That prompted the usual flurry of articles.

As well as the articles, you can find the Vagrant builds of Cloud Control 13.5 on Ol7 and OL8 in my Vagrant GitHub repo here.

Our current installation is running on an Oracle Linux 6 VM, so I was just about to start a new build on a new OS, which would have the added bonus of allowing us to use Oracle 19c under the hood. Now I can go straight to 13.5, which is nice.

I’ve mentioned before, we use EMCLI to add targets and jobs into Cloud Control, so rather than upgrading as I normally do, this time I’ll probably do a clean build on the new kit and gradually migrate services across to it.

Happy upgrading! 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

How will my content change?

I was on a call a few weeks ago and the subject of technical content came up. As someone who produces a certain type of content, I had some thoughts related to cloud services. Specifically how cloud services make my style of content less meaningful these days.

A large part of my content could be described as “traditional” DBA content. As we move more systems to the cloud, and start to use increasingly automated database services, the “traditional” DBA is becoming less relevant, and therefore a certain proportion of my content is becoming less relevant with it. We are due to get an on-prem release of Oracle database 21c soon, and I’ll certainly be doing some installation articles for that, but how many more releases after that will need installation articles? How many more releases will require traditional DBA content? At some point we’ll be using cloud-based data services, so people like me won’t be installing or patching stuff anymore. What does that mean for my content?

Of course, if I’m still working I will still be producing content. As followers of the blog know, writing stuff is part of my learning process, so every time I’m learning something new, you are likely to see some articles appear on that subject. The issue is, if the traditional DBA content stops being necessary, or I’m just not doing DBA work anymore, what sort of content will I be producing?

The short answer is I don’t really know. I don’t think any DBA knows what they will be doing in five years. I suspect I will be some form of developer, but I don’t really know what type of developer. I would imagine it would be data-related, but who knows…

If this post raises any questions in your mind, I’m afraid I’m not the person to answer them. It’s just a really odd time…

Cheers

Tim…