Fedora 36 and Oracle

Fedora 36 was released recently. Here comes the standard warning.

Here are the usual things I do when a new version of Fedora comes out.

Why do I do this? As mentioned in the first link, Fedora is a proving ground for future versions of RHEL, and therefore Oracle Linux. I like to see what is coming around the corner. Doing this has no “real world” value, but I’m a geek, and this is what geeks do. 🙂

As an aside, when Fedora 35 was released I was having a lot of trouble getting 19c and 21c installed on it. I tried a number of times over the course of a few weeks and failed each time. When I tried those same installations on Fedora 36 they just worked, so I went back and tried on Fedora 35 again, and they worked there too. Clearly there have been some changes to underlying Fedora 35 packages that have fixed whatever the problem was with the Oracle installations. As a result, I also produced these.

Now that Fedora 36 exists, these Fedora 35 installations are not really necessary, but it’s nice to do them for the sake of completeness.

I pushed Vagrant builds to my GitHub.

If you want to try these out, you will need to build the base Vagrant boxes using Packer. You can find the Packer builds on my GitHub too.

So now you know how to do it, please don’t! 🙂

What’s New?

So what’s new with Fedora 36? It’s a bleeding edge distribution, so as you might expect, loads of package version updates, bringing most things to the latest and greatest versions. The things that stand out for me are Ansible 5 and Podman 4.0. If you want a more complete perspective on this, you might want to look here.

Cheers

Tim…

Oracle Database 19c on Fedora 32

Fedora 32 was released at the end of April (see here). Here comes the standard warning.

Here are the usual things I do when a new version of Fedora comes out.

I pushed a Vagrant build to GitHub.

So now you know how to do it, don’t. 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Oracle 18c and 12c on Fedora 29

Danger, Will Robinson! Obligatory warning below.

So here we go…

Fedora 29 has been out for a bit over a week now. Over the weekend I had a play with it and noticed a couple of differences between Fedora 28 and Fedora 29 as far as Oracle installations are concerned. There are some extra packages that need to be installed. Also, one of the two symbolic links that were needed for the Oracle installation on Fedora 28 is now present in Fedora 29, but pointing to the wrong version of the package.

Here are the articles I did as a result of this.

It’s pretty similar to the installation on Fedora 28, with the exception of the extra packages and a slight alteration to the symbolic links.

Once the “bento/fedora-29” box becomes available I’ll probably do a Vagrant build for this, but for the moment is was the old fashioned approach. 🙂

So now you know how to do it, please don’t! 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Oracle 12c on Fedora 28

As always, I have to start with a warning.

So here we go…

Fedora 28 has been out for quite a while now. I installed it pretty much when it was released, but hit a problem with installing Oracle 12c on it. I didn’t have much time to investigate at the time and I kind-of forgot about it. A couple of days ago someone asked me about it, so I had another attempt. The only difference compared to Fedora 27 was a couple of extra symbolic links were needed.

Here were the articles I did as a result of this.

It’s pretty much the same as the installation on Fedora 27, with the exception of those extra symbolic links.

If you are feeling lazy/efficient you can do it all with Vagrant, as described here. 🙂

So now you know how to do it, please don’t! 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Oracle 12c on Fedora 27

As always, I have to start with a warning.

With that out of the way…

Fedora 27 has been out for a couple of weeks now, but I’ve not really been able to do anything with it because I couldn’t get it installed on VirtualBox. I finally managed to get the installation to work, provided I used the Live DVD when I was running VirtualBox on an Oracle Linux 7 host. That means I was finally able to have a play with 12cR2 on Fedora 27.

It’s pretty much the same as the installation on Fedora 26.

So now you know how to do it, please don’t! 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

 

Oracle 12c on Fedora 26

Before we get into this, I feel the need to mention this important caveat, so I don’t get any grief about this.

With that done, here we go…

Fedora 26 has been out for a while now. As soon as it dropped I tried to do some 12c installations on it and hit a stumbling block. The software would install and link fine, but it wouldn’t start up Oracle processes, so you couldn’t actually create a database using the DBCA or SQL*Plus. I roped in Frits Hoogland to help me find the issue, which he did through the magic of strace. 🙂

With that information, a bit of Googling revealed other software that was struggling with changes to glibc, with the only reliable solution (to their problems) being to downgrade to glibc from Fedora 25. That didn’t sound too satisfactory to me.

If I’m honest, I got kind-of bored by it until Andy Campbell made me aware of a workaround, so I was finally able to get 12cR1 and 12cR2 working fine on Fedora 26.

Not surprisingly, the 12cR1 installation still suffers from that Perl issue on newer chipsets. The 12cR2 installation is a lot clearer by comparison.

So now you know how to do it, please don’t! 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Oracle Database 12c on Fedora 25

I was having a play around with Fedora 25 last weekend and I just noticed there was no associated blog post about it, so here goes.

First the warning I always have to include. Do not install Oracle on Fedora before reading this! With that out of the way, let’s continue.

Since Fedora is the proving ground for future releases of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and I’m a fan of running Oracle on a binary clone of RHEL called Oracle Linux (OL), I am curious about any new release.

Not surprisingly, Oracle database 12c installs really easily on Fedora 25, just as it did on previous releases.

I did have the usual problem with the Perl stuff, as I’m running the VM on a relatively modern MacBook Pro, which has a CPU that freaks out the version of Perl shipped with Oracle, but the article includes a link about how to fix that. I’ve repeated the installation under VirtualBox on systems using older chips (my work PC and an old server at home) and it works without complaint. No drama.

So all seems well in the world of Oracle 12c on Fedora 25. Now you know how to do it, please don’t. Use Oracle Linux. 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Fedora 24 and Oracle 12c

fedoraFedora 24 was released a few days ago. As usual I had a play around with it and tried installing Oracle on it.

First comes the warnings, because people keep misunderstand why I do this. Do not install Oracle on Fedora before reading this!

With that out of the way, here’s what I did.

No real drama here. It was pretty much the same as Fedora 23 in that respect.

It’s kind-of hard to get excited about a new version of Fedora since I switched my desktop from Fedora to Mac. One thing that was interesting is the change to the upgrade process. In previous releases I used “fedup” to do it. Now it’s pretty much done using DNF (YUM). If you are interested, you can read about it here.

Cheers

Tim…

Fedora 23 and Oracle 11gR2/12cR1

A few months ago I mentioned doing some Fedora 22 installations. At the time I did some pre-emptive installations on the Alpha release of Fedora 23 also.

Now the final release of Fedora 23 is out, I’ve run through the articles again to make sure things are all ship-shape.

It’s pretty much as it was before, with the nice bonus that the “MATE Desktop” package group has been fixed. Happy days! 🙂

As always, installations of Oracle server products on Fedora are not a great idea, as explained here.

If you do like playing with this stuff, knock yourself out… 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Fedora 22/23 and Oracle 11gR2/12cR1

linux-tuxAs always, installations of Oracle server products on Fedora are not a great idea, as explained here.

I was reading some stuff about the Fedora 23 Alpha and realised Fedora 22 had passed me by. Not sure how I missed that. 🙂

Anyway, I did a run through of the usual play stuff.

While I was at it, I thought I would get the heads-up on Fedora 23 Alpha.

The F23 stuff will have to be revised once the final version is out, but I’m less likely to forget now. 🙂

I guess the only change in F22 upward that really affects me is the deprecation of YUM in F22 in favour of the DNF fork. For the most part, you just switch the command.

#This:
yum install my-package -y
yum groupinstall my-package-group -y
yum update -y

#Becomes:
dnf install my-package -y
dnf groupinstall  my-package-group -y
dnf group install  my-package-group -y
dnf update -y

This did cause one really annoying problem in F23 though. The “MATE Desktop” had a single documentation package that was causing a problem. Usually I would use the following.

yum groupinstall "MATE Desktop" -y --skip-broken

Unfortunately, DNF doesn’t support “–skip-broken”, so I was left to either manually install the pieces, or give up. I chose the latter and use LXDE instead. 🙂 F23 is an Alpha, so you expect issues, but DNF has been in since F22 and still no “–skip-broken”, which I find myself using a lot. Pity.

Cheers

Tim…