Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c Release 3 (13.3.0.0) : Installation & Upgrade

Cloud Control 13c (13.3) was released a few days ago, but from what I can see the documentation hasn’t been made available yet (see update). Despite this I had a go at installing it using the instructions for 13.2, and with a couple of small exceptions it was similar, which wasn’t surprising. The upgrade from 13.2 to 13.3 was similar to the previous upgrade from 13.1 to 13.2 also.

I’ve added a couple of articles to the website.

These articles are in no way a replacement for reading the manuals (if there were any), but it will hopefully give you a feel for how easy it can be to get going with Cloud Control.

For the installation article I did the basic setup of the box and the DB using Vagrant. You can repeat the build using my Vagrant setup here if you like.

Note. I used a different database version for the upgrade article to more closely match what I have at work. This was basically a trial run for a work upgrade, although that will probably not happen for a few months because of other priorities.

I will revisit both articles once I get eyes on the documentation. 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Update: Thanks to Peter in the comments whoe found the docs here.

Why Automation Matters : ITIL

ITIL is quite a divisive subject in the geek world. Once the subject is raised most of us geeks start channelling our inner cowboy/cowgirl thinking we don’t need the shackles of a formal process, because we know what we are doing and don’t make mistakes. Once something goes wrong everyone looks around saying, “I didn’t do anything!”

Despite how annoying it can seem at times, you need something like ITIL for a couple of reasons:

  • It’s easy to be blinkered. I see so many people who can’t see beyond their own goals, even if that means riding roughshod over other projects and the needs of the business. You need something in place to control this.
  • You need a paper trail. As soon as something goes wrong you need to know what’s changed. If you ask people you will hear a resounding chorus of “I’ve not changed anything!”, sometimes followed by, “… except…”. It’s a lot easier to get to the bottom issues if you know exactly what has happened and in what order.

So what’s this got to do with automation? The vast majority of ITIL related tasks I’m forced to do should be invisible to me. Imagine the build and deployments of a new version of an application to a development server. The process might look like this.

  • Someone requests a new deployment manually, or it is done automatically on a schedule or triggered by a commit.
  • A new deployment request is raised.
  • The code is pulled from source control.
  • The build is completed and result of the build recorded in the deployment request.
  • Automated testing is used to test the new build. Let’s assume it’s all successful for the rest of the list. The results of the testing are recorded in the deployment request.
  • Artifacts from the build are stored in some form of artefact store.
  • The newly built application is deployed to the application server.
  • The result of the deployment is recorded in the deployment request.
  • Any necessary changes to the CMDB are recorded.
  • The deployment request is closed as successful.

None of those tasks require a human. For a development server the changes are all pre-approved, and all the ITIL “work” is automated, so you have a the full paper trail, even for your development servers.

It’s hard to be annoyed by ITIL if most of it is invisible to you! 🙂

IMHO the biggest problem with ITIL is bad implementation. Over complication, emphasis on manual operations and lack of continuous improvement. If ITIL is hindering your progress you are doing it wrong. The same could be said about lots of things. 🙂 One way of solving this is to automate the problem out of existence.

Cheers

Tim…

MobaXTerm 10.8

About a week ago MobaXTerm 10.7 was released, and today we got MobaXTerm 10.8. 🙂

The downloads and changelog are in the usual places.

Now I’ve moved back to Windows full time this is what I use at work and at home. Happy days! 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

VirtualBox 5.2.14

While I was away VirtualBox 5.2.14 was released.

The downloads and changelog are in the usual places.

I’ve done the install on my Windows 10 laptop and on my Windows 10 PC at work and both worked fine.

I also pulled down the latest version of Vagrant (2.1.2) and did a complete rebuild of some stuff. From what I can see it’s all good. 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Update: I also did both upgrades on macOS and they worked fine also.

Oracle Code : Paris – The Journey Home

I left Oracle Code : Paris a little after 5 PM. I got in the taxi, got a few miles down the road and realised I had left my phone charging in the speaker room. Doh! I got the taxi to turn round so I could pick it up. Phone in hand, I got back in the taxi and off we went…

The roads were a lot slower the second time round, but I kept drifting into sleep so I didn’t mind so much. I was awake when the motorbike hit us. It wasn’t bad and I get the impression it happens all the time judging by the taxi driver’s reaction. He just waved his hand and carried on…

There was a bit of a “misunderstanding” at the airport with the taxi driver. I was a bit out of it at this point, so I didn’t really notice how much I was actually charged. Let’s just say the cost of the detour was significantly more than I would consider reasonable, but by the time I noticed I was in the airport and he was off to start his retirement…

I got into the airport and went to the check-in desk, where the lady told me I had the wrong name on my ticket. It said “Tim” not “Timothy”. I showed her my boarding pass from the out-leg and it had the same mistake. I was sent off to the security desk for them to check it all out. I got the distinct impression if I hadn’t had the boarding pass for the out-leg they wouldn’t have let me check in, but since I had already flown out of Birmingham under the “wrong name”, I might as well fly back. I was sent back to the check-in desk and allowed through…

Boarding started unusually early. Once on board I got a free seat next to me, which was good, and an announcement that we would be held in the plane for 60 minutes because the air space above the airport was too busy for us to take off. That was not so good…

Once we did get under way the flight took about 50 minutes and was fine. Back in the UK it was a short taxi ride home, watching live messages of the penalty shoot-out. Well done England. Bad luck Colombia. We’ve lost on penalties so many times. It’s a bad way to go out. 🙁

And that was Oracle Code : Paris done!

Thanks to the Oracle Code folks for organising the event and letting me come along. Thanks to the attendees and other speakers at the event. Thanks also to all the people took pity on the sickly child that I was during the event. Thanks also to the Oracle ACE Program and Oracle Developer Champion Program for helping me be ill in every country in the world… 🙂

Please let this be the end of the curse!

Cheers

Tim…

Oracle Code : Paris 2018

Oracle Code : Paris started with a short walk from the hotel to the venue. After signing in it all began…

The first session of the day was a keynote by Lonneke Dikmans called “What Happened to My Order? The Need for Orchestration in Modern Architectures”, comparing BPEL orchestrations with orchestrations and choreography used in microservices and serverless architectures. It was a really good introduction to the concepts.

Next up was James Allerton-Austin with “Building a Chatbot Front-end for Blockchain Transactions and Serverless Functions APIs”, which included a description of the stack offered by Oracle and a demo of selling Larry’s car. During this session there were also brief stints by Karim Zein and JeanMarc Hui Bon Hoa.

From there I went to the speaker room and started to feel decidedly odd. I sometimes get migraines that don’t give me a headache, but make me feel dizzy and nauseous. The following couple of hours were mostly lying on the floor and going to the toilets to puke.

I did pop in to see “Build a Decentralized Blockchain Application with Hyperledger Fabric and Composer” by Robert van Mölken, hoping it would distract me.

I also popped my head in to Women in Technology (WIT) session to see what the turnout was like. It was very busy. It was in French, so I could understand what was going on. 🙂

After that I went back to the speaker room floor, then before I knew it, it was time for my session, but not before another conversation with the toilet bowl…

Adrenalin is a wonderful drug. I warned the audience I might have to leave suddenly, but I managed to get through my session without any major problems. I lost the internet connection a couple of times, and had to reconnect to my 18c DBaaS instance on Oracle Cloud. The new laptop behaved itself though. Once my talk was over the Adrenalin started to subside and I felt worse again, but not as bad as before. I was sitting still and chatting to some of the folks in the speaker room for the rest of the afternoon, and I only remember puking once more after my sessions, which was an improvement…

Pretty soon it was time to leave for the airport and Oracle Code : Paris was over for me. Thanks everyone for making it happen. Sorry I wasn’t able to participate more. This year’s conference curse seems to be continuing.

I’ll write about the journey home in a separate post as that is already proving “interesting”, in a conference curse style… 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Oracle Code : Paris – The Journey Begins

It was a normal start to the day. I woke up with my regular work alarm, packed and got a taxi to the airport.

The drive was quick and the taxi driver was interesting, which helps. I couldn’t do online check-in because my ticket was with Air France, but the flight was Flybe. Neither website would let me check in online. I was dreading an epic queue, but fortunately the airport was quiet. Even so, I witnessed someone wearing ear-buds being asked the same question multiple times. Can’t we pass a law to make it legal to smack people that do this?

The flight to Paris was due to take off at 11:35, but it was about 11:50 when we finally departed. I got lucky with a free seat next to me, so I was able to get the laptop out and do some work. I was not so lucky with the folks on the other side of the aisle, who were far too loud.

I took a train from the airport to the city centre, then got a taxi from there to my hotel. It was about 5 minutes walk from the conference venue and 10 minutes from the Eiffel Tower, so I walked across to check them both out, then it was back to the hotel to run through my session and demo for tomorrow, then crash…

Cheers

Tim…