VirtualBox and Vagrant : New RAC Stuff and Changes

There were a lot of changes in my Vagrant repository on GitHub last week and over the weekend.

First, I got asked a question about 12.2 RAC and I couldn’t be bothered to run through a manual build, so I took my 18c RAC hands-off build and amended it to create a 12.2 RAC hands-off build. Along the way I noticed a couple of hard-coded bits in the 18c build I hadn’t noticed previously, which I altered of course. I also had to move the 18c build to a version-specific sub-directory. I think I’ve altered all references to the location.

I went through some of my individual server builds and updated them to use the latest versions of Tomcat 9, Java 11 and APEX 18.2. All that was pretty straight forward.

On Sunday I was running some tests of the builds on my laptop while I was at my brother’s house, and I noticed I was not pulling packages from the yum repositories properly. I ended up adding “nameserver 8.8.8.8” to pretty much all the “/etc/resolv.conf” files inside the VMs. I’m not sure what has changed as that hasn’t happened before, so I’m not sure if it’s something to do with the networking… Anyway, it fixed everything, so happy days.

While I was doing these builds I learned something new. I forgot to amend the path to my ASM disks from a UNIX style path “/u05/VirtualBox/shared/ol7_183_rac/…” to a Windows style path. Vagrant didn’t care and just created the location under the C drive as “C:\u05\VirtualBox\shared\ol7_183_rac\”. I’ll have to add a note about that to my “README.md” files about that.

I’ve still got to update some Docker builds with the latest software. I’ll probably do that over this week…

Cheers

Tim…

 

How To Learn Real Application Clusters (RAC) Administration

glasses-272399_1280-smallIn yesterday’s post about Learning, Career Development and Mentoring I mentioned a specific question I had been asked about learning RAC. I get it quite a bit, and after reading the comments from that post I thought I would write something I could use as a reply to that type of question in future. So here it is.

It’s very much an opinion piece, but I would like to know what other RAC admins think. This is very much a starting point. I’m sure the article will change over time as I think about it and people comment on it. 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Oracle 12c RAC on Oracle Linux 6 and 7 using NFS

linux-tuxFollowing on from the last post, I’ve brought my NFS RAC stuff up to date also.

I noticed I had not done a RAC install using NFS on Oracle Linux 6, so I threw that in for good measure too. 🙂

Just as a little history to this… I was doing the desktop Oracle RAC thing (using VMware then VirtualBox) for a while, when I started reading some blog posts by Kevin Closson about NFS. At the time, NFS filers were considered the poor relation to SANs, which was obvious or they wouldn’t be so cheap in comparison right? In those articles Kevin pointed out that most people’s systems at the time probably weren’t capable of maxing out a decent filer if it were set up correctly. Since NFS is a cluster file system, that got me thinking I should try RAC on it to see how easy it was. That was in the Oracle 10g days. How time flies when you are having fun… 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Oracle 12cR1 RAC Installation on Windows 2012 Using VirtualBox…

After having a play with Oracle 12c on Windows 8, I decided to give Windows Server 2012 a go. Here is the resulting virtual RAC installation.

As you would expect, much of the process is pretty similar to the 11gR2 RAC installation on Windows 2008.

Windows Server 2012 is a strange beast. The interface is quite similar to Windows 8, which seems strange for a server OS. I’m gradually coming to terms with the Windows 8, so I am not so repulsed any more. That’s not to say I think it is the correct thing for Microsoft to do, but the thought of supporting my family on it is not filling me with quite so much dread now.

I really should get round to upgrading my desktop to Fedora 19, but time has been short. 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Oracle Database 12c Virtual RAC Installation on Oracle Linux 6

I finally got my server problems sorted out yesterday, so I was able to do a 12c virtual RAC installation. You can see what I did here:

The setup is pretty much the same as the 11gR2 setup. So there’s no real drama at all.

With the basic installation articles out of the way I can start having a play with the functionality.

I’ve now got 12c running under VirtualBox on my server (Oracle Linux), desktop (Fedora 18), laptop (OS X) and desktop at work (Windows 7). If I can just get it running on my Nexus 4 and Nexus 7… 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

 

My Plans for Oracle 12c RAC Thwarted…

My initial batch of 12c installations resulted in these two articles.

Judging by my web stats, they’ve proved very popular. According to Google Analytics, there are 3-4 active visitors on them pretty much 24×7.

My progress from there has been thwarted somewhat by technical issues. The server I normally use for my Virtual RAC installations is being a little funky at the moment. Rather than mess about I figured I would just reinstall the base OS. Initially it was running Fedora 18, but I decided to go for Oracle Linux instead. This server is used entirely for running VirtualBox VMs, so stability is more important than being bleeding edge. My desktop is still Fedora though.

The Oracle Linux install was fine. The 6.4 spin of Oracle Linux detected all my hardware, including the RAID stuff, and it installed with no worries. The problem is getting all the VMs back on to it from my backups. It’s taking an age! 🙂

Hopefully tonight, or tomorrow I can get back on the case with the 12c RAC installation. Yury from Pythian has already done a run through, which you can see here. There doesn’t seem to be much difference to the infrastructure setup compared 11gR2 RAC, which is good.

Cheers

Tim…

Oracle 11gR2 RAC Installation on Oracle Linux 5

As promised in a recent post, I’ve updated the Oracle 11gR2 RAC on Oracle Linux 5 article. It now uses VirtualBox 4.2.6, rather than 3.2.8 as it was before, and Oracle Linux 5.8.

I’ve purposely left it as an 11.2.0.1 installation as you can get this from OTN without needing access to My Oracle Support (MOS). The process works just as well for 11.2.0.3 and I would recommend you use that if you do have access to MOS. Remember, if you are doing the RAC installation on Oracle Linux 6 you are going to need 11.2.0.3, so OL5 might be the right option if you are playing around with this at home with no access to MOS.

Cheers

Tim…

Oracle 11gR2 RAC Installation on Oracle Linux 6

I spent today updating my Oracle 11gR2 RAC installation on OL6 article. The original article used an older version of VirtualBox , which meant some of the screen shots looked a little dated. It’s now updated to VirtualBox 4.2.6, so it should be a little less confusing for anyone who is new to VirtualBox.

I’ll probably update the OL5 RAC article some time this next week, since that article uses VirtualBox 3.2.8, which is pretty much ancient history now. 🙂

Cheers

Tim…

Virtualized Oracle RAC and more…

Followers of my blog know I like doing virtual RAC installations.When I do these I’m focusing very much on the Oracle side of things, leaving the virtualization tool to handle the hardware virtualization, like networking and shared disk.

A few weeks ago Gilbert Standen contacted me to say he had done a virtual RAC installation using OpenvSwitch to virtualize the network components. He posted some basic tips. When I mentioned it on G+ and twitter, it generated some interest, so I suggested he write it up with a little more detail. That process has started now on his blog. You can see the first couple of articles here:

He tells me he’ll be adding more details to the posts when time permits.

If you are more focused on the network side of the infrastructure stack I think this is a really interesting proposition and well worth a read.

Cheers

Tim…

DNS Config for RAC SCAN… Again…

Some time ago I wrote an article about configuring DNS for the SCAN address in Oracle 11gR2 RAC.

Over the last couple of days one of the Oakies has given me some feedback on the article based on his experiences with Oracle Linux 5.

For my virtual RAC installations I typically do the DNS configuration on the host machine, which is running Fedora. It seems Oracle Linux 5 is a little different. Just to make sure I ran through the setup on Oracle Linux 5 and 6 to see what the score was.

Oracle Linux 6 is pretty much the same as Fedora as far as installation and configuration of BIND is concerned. Oracle Linux 5 (and also RHEL5 I assume) is a little funky in that it doesn’t create the default config files automatically. There are sample files you can use, but they contain a load of crap you don’t need and are missing some stuff you do. The easiest way to get it configured is to install the “system-config-bind” package and start the GUI. This notices you have no config and sets it up for you. You can then exit the GUI and do the manual config as described in the article. Very odd.

I’ve made a note about this in the article, so it shouldn’t trip anyone else up. I’ve also given some examples of the manually adjusted default named.conf files for each distro.

Cheers

Tim…