Fedora 36 and Oracle

 

Fedora 36 was released recently. Here comes the standard warning.

Here are the usual things I do when a new version of Fedora comes out.

Why do I do this? As mentioned in the first link, Fedora is a proving ground for future versions of RHEL, and therefore Oracle Linux. I like to see what is coming around the corner. Doing this has no “real world” value, but I’m a geek, and this is what geeks do. 🙂

As an aside, when Fedora 35 was released I was having a lot of trouble getting 19c and 21c installed on it. I tried a number of times over the course of a few weeks and failed each time. When I tried those same installations on Fedora 36 they just worked, so I went back and tried on Fedora 35 again, and they worked there too. Clearly there have been some changes to underlying Fedora 35 packages that have fixed whatever the problem was with the Oracle installations. As a result, I also produced these.

Now that Fedora 36 exists, these Fedora 35 installations are not really necessary, but it’s nice to do them for the sake of completeness.

I pushed Vagrant builds to my GitHub.

If you want to try these out, you will need to build the base Vagrant boxes using Packer. You can find the Packer builds on my GitHub too.

So now you know how to do it, please don’t! 🙂

What’s New?

So what’s new with Fedora 36? It’s a bleeding edge distribution, so as you might expect, loads of package version updates, bringing most things to the latest and greatest versions. The things that stand out for me are Ansible 5 and Podman 4.0. If you want a more complete perspective on this, you might want to look here.

Cheers

Tim…

Author: Tim...

DBA, Developer, Author, Trainer.

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