Why Automation Matters : Your automation is your documentation

 

How many times have you been following a process defined in a knowledge base note, only to find something has been omitted, or is unclear? This may be because of empire building, laziness or more often oversight, but the result is the same. Unless your processes are well documented, you always run the risk of progress drawing to a halt when “the right person” is not present.

One of the great things about automation is, by definition, every step of the process must be defined. If person X is on holiday, you can be 100% sure all the steps to complete the automation are present.

Of course, this doesn’t stop people writing stupid, ugly and hard to understand code, but your development process should have some control over that. Even if it doesn’t, you know the answer is there. It must be there because the process works.

Does that mean you don’t need to document automations?

No. The automations should be self documenting. I don’t mean that in the sense that “my code is so good it’s self-documenting”, which is the calling card of the lazy developer. I mean that automation code in your source control system should be documented. Markdown is a quick and easy tool that allows us to easily document our code, and the good thing about it is it remains close to the code. It’s right next to it in the repository. When we change our code, we should revise our documentation where necessary. The documentation becomes a living document, rather than some 1000 page word document that nobody ever reads, and nobody updates.

But documentation sucks!

Documentation gets a really bad rap because most people are doing it wrong. They fall into one of these traps.

  • They produce too little, which means people are unlikely to find what they are looking for.
  • They produce too much, which makes it daunting to look at, so nobody bothers.
  • It’s overly formal, which is dry and boring.
  • It’s hidden, or at least separate to the code, so people might not even know it exists.

Basic pointers and how-to examples are good enough for 90% of the cases, so make these the focus of your documentation. You can always give links to more detailed documentation for those people that need a little more. The context is slightly different, but this post on Structuring Content should give you some clues about how to structure your documentation. After all, documentation is content. 🙂

Conclusion

For some companies an automation or infrastructure as code project may well be the first time in their company history that they have got everything about a process documented. That has to be a positive result for the company!

Check out the rest of the series here.

Cheers

Tim…

Author: Tim...

DBA, Developer, Author, Trainer.

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