Databases Running in the Cloud


cloudI’ve been playing around with running databases in the cloud recently. It’s quite simplistic stuff, just to get a feel for it and investigate the possibilities of using it for some projects at work. Here’s what I’ve got so far.




SQL Server:

It’s hard to differentiate between the cloud providers if you are just using them to provide a VM and self managing a system on it. It’s just another box provider.

In contrast the DBaaS offerings are much more interesting. I really like what Amazon are doing with RDS for Oracle/MySQL/SQL Server. I think these would work very well for *our* MySQL and SQL Server installations, which tend to be quite simple. I’m not sure I can live with some of the restrictions for RDS for Oracle, but that’s probably because I’m a snobby DBA type, who thinks he knows best. :) The DBaaS for SQL Server on Azure is also really nice. You get less control than the RDS version, but maybe that’s a good thing.

You might have noticed I’ve not written much about Oracle Cloud yet. I should be getting a trial of the platform this month, so I will be able to fill in those gaps then.



SQL Developer 4 EA2 Connecting to SQL Server


I wrote a blog post some time ago about using SQL Developer 3.x to connect to SQL Server. I tried the same thing today from SQL Developer 4 EA2 and it works just fine.

You have to download the 3rd party JDBC driver and point SQL Developer to it. You can read how to do it here.



Update: My colleague just told me this.

“If you at any point decide to use Windows authentication to connect (like I just did), you might hit this error:

Status : Failure -I/O Error: SSO Failed: Native SSPI library not loaded. Check the java.library.path system property.

…found a work around, which involves copying the ‘jtds-1.2\x86 (or X64)\SSO\ntlmauth.dll’ from the JTDS directory to the JDK’s \jdk\jre\bin folder. Then I restarted SQL Developer and it worked J”

SQL Developer and MS SQL Server…


This afternoon I’ve been cleaning up some data in an SQL Server database. I decided to use SQL*Developer to connect to SQL Server by following this post.

I made liberal use of the following tip when dealing with TEXT and NTEXT types.

The joys of dealing with multiple engines…



SQL Server to Oracle for developers…


I get a number of questions from developers who are used to working with SQL Server, but have recently moved to Oracle. The top 2 issues are:

  • Lack of AutoNumber/Identity columns in Oracle (solution).
  • How to return recordsets from stored procedures (solution).

Recently I had a question about how you return the value assigned by a sequence during a DML statement, either directly or when using a trigger to populate the sequence value. The one option is the RETURNING INTO clause, but I checked my site and couldn’t find an example of it to direct them too, so I wrote one (here). :)