What architecture are you using for your production Oracle databases? (Poll Results Discussed)

I was having an email discussion with the folks from DBmarlin, and the question came up about the adoption of the multitenant architecture. Were people using the multitenant architecture, or sticking with the non-CDB architecture for now?

Followers of the blog know I threw my hat in with the multitenant architecture from Oracle 12.1.0.2 onward. We use Oracle 19c for everything of value now (there are a couple of dead projects still on 11.2) and all but one of those projects use PDBs. Suspecting I was not the norm here, I asked some questions on Twitter.

As usual I’m going to start with some caveats. The sample size is small. People who interact about tech on social media my not be a diverse sample. I’m going to act like these results are representative of the wider scene, but they may not be.

Here is the first question.

What architecture are you using for your production Oracle databases?

The fact that only 33% were on non-CDB only was a positive sign in my view. The introduction of the multitenant architecture made a lot of people nervous, and it was not without its problems in the early days. Even so, the combined total of only non-CDB and mostly non-CDB is still 50% of respondents. When you consider Oracle 21c makes the multitenant architecture mandatory, and the next long term release is 23c, there is a lot of work for people to do when they make the switch to 23c. The conversion is simple enough. It’s the testing resource that could hurt people.

Having 50% of people using mostly PDBs or all PDBs is a really good sign, and will make life much easier for them when they come to upgrade to the next long term release.

To dig a little deeper I asked this question.

Are you provisioning new production Oracle databases as PDBs?

So just over 65% of people said they are provisioning new Oracle databases as PDBs. That’s very positive, and makes a lot of sense going forward. Why would 35% of people stick with the non-CDB architecture for new databases? Some things I can think of include.

  • They are using an older versions of the database, and don’t have the option of using the multitenant architecture.
  • They want a one-size-fits-all approach to the database, and will convert everything when they are forced to.
  • Vendors don’t support the multitenant architecture. I have one project where I suspect the vendor doesn’t even know the multitenant architecture exists, let alone supports it.
  • Internal development teams haven’t caught up with the database version. From my experience, the only thing that was really affected by our move to PBDs was CRON jobs using OS authentication. We switched to using secure external password stores and everything was fine. I wrote an article on possible solutions to the OS authentication issue here.

If I was not working at my company, I don’t believe they would have been running on 19c with PDBs. I’ve been pushing for many years to improve the attitudes to upgrades and patching. The easy path is to do nothing…

Finally I wondered how many people were purchasing the multitenant option. Remember, from 19c onward you can run up to 3 user-defined PDBs without having to buy the multitenant option.

For those people using PDBs for production Oracle databases, have you bought the Multitenant Option?

At 35%, I’m actually surprised how many people have purchased the multitenant option. I expected it to be a lot lower. Don’t get me wrong, I think the multitenant architecture is fine. I’ve been advocating for people to switch to it and use lone-pdb since it was introduced on Oracle 12.1. I would like to use more than 3 PDBs per 19c instance, but I can’t justify the cost for a feature that I could argue should be free in all editions.

So there you have it. A quick snapshot of what my followers are saying.

Remember, the multitenant architecture is mandatory from Oracle 21c onward, with Oracle 23c being the next long term support release, so you are going to have to get comfortable with this stuff if you want to remain in support long term.

If you want any help getting to grips with the multitenant architecture I have a load of articles and videos.

Cheers

Tim…

Operating Systems for Oracle Databases, Including Windows This Time… (Poll Results Discussed)

Last week I put out a post about operating systems used for running Oracle databases.

Operating Systems for Oracle Databases (Poll Results Discussed)

This was the first question from the previous post.

Which operating system are you using for your Oracle database servers?

Unfortunately I forgot to include Windows. A number of people contacted me about this, asking if I would ask the question again and include Windows this time, so I did. Also, this time I was explicit about production systems, because I suspect some people were answering about their home setup… ๐Ÿ™‚

So here we go for the second time…

Which operating system are you using for the majority of your **production** Oracle Databases servers? Not demo kit on your PC at home. A repeat of last week, but remembering to include Windows this time…

We can see Linux is still the clear winner, with UNIX and Windows battling it out for the second place spot. Going back to my statement from the last post, there is no point in purposely making yourself a minority, which would clearly suggest Linux is the place to be.ย Windows is a slight exception to that, because if your company has no experience on Linux, but a good grounding in Windows administration, it might be a good idea for you to stick with Windows, rather than doing a bad job with Linux. I can’t imagine there are many places with good UNIX skills and no Linux skills, so I’m not going to give the same “get out of jail free card” for that. ๐Ÿ™‚

So as I said before, Linux is dominating, so you can see why there is so few posts about Oracle on other platforms these days…

Cheers

Tim…

Operating Systems for Oracle Databases (Poll Results Discussed)

I put out some questions on Twitter a couple of days ago, asking about the operating systems people were using for their Oracle database servers.

As with all these polls, we have to discuss some caveats. Most of the people that follow me are from the Oracle community, so that puts a heavy bias on the outcome. The questions relate to Oracle databases, which also influences the results. Someone may choose one distribution to run Oracle workloads, and a different distribution to run non-Oracle workloads. We also have to remember the sample size is small. Despite this, I’m going to discuss the results as if this were a representative sample of people, even though I accept it may not be. ๐Ÿ™‚

This was the first question I asked.

Which operating system are you using for your Oracle Databases servers?

You’ll notice I totally forgot to include Windows, which was a shame because it would have been nice to see that. My main focus was to see how many people were still holding on to the traditional UNIX systems. There was a really strong showing for Linux over UNIX, which was hardly surprising. Every year the dominance of Linux is increasing. A few years back a lot of big companies were still using the traditional UNIX systems, but I guess a lot of people have got sick of spending that sort of cash, and some have probably switched to buying Exadata kit instead. I cant say I’m surprised by this result.

Something I’ve said repeatedly over the years is you should stick to the operating system that is the most popular, as that is the one that is going to get tested the most. There is no point in purposely making yourself a minority IMHO. Having lived through the death of Oracle on Tru64 and HP-UX, I wouldn’t dream of using anything other than Linux now.

This was the next question.

For Linux users, which Linux distro are you using for your Oracle database servers?

Over 65% of the folks picked Oracle Linux, and about 27% picked RHEL. The fact this is a poll about Oracle database servers no doubt added to the skew in this result. Oracle have done a good job of promoting Oracle Linux, and the fact it is free probably helps a lot. I thought Oracle Linux would be the winner here, but I’m not sure I expected it to be by this much. Personally I wouldn’t run on anything other than Oracle Linux by choice. Remember, this is what Exadata uses, and this is what Oracle Cloud uses.

I suspect some of the people that picked “Other” were speaking about non-production systems. Perhaps I should have made it clear I was thinking about production, not test labs…

This was the final question.

For Enterprise Linux users, which version of Oracle Linux and/or RHEL are you using for your Oracle database servers?

It’s good to see that nobody is owning up to OL5/RHEL5. There are still a few things lingering on OL6/RHEL6, but I guess those are probably running old versions of the database.

OL7/RHEL7 is still the most common version, but I guess a lot of this is down to the long lifespan of database servers. I suspect many of these servers were provisioned some time ago. I’m hoping most new deployments are using OL8/RHEL8.

So nothing really that surprising about the outcome of this batch of questions. Pity I didn’t include Windows in the first question. Maybe next time…

Cheers

Tim…